Our Story

The Beginnings

At a meeting on 5th December 1908, it was agreed to establish Woodend Bowling and Tennis club consisting of 2 bowling greens, 4 tennis courts and a pavilion. A build cost of £1300-£1500 was proposed and there was consensus that the club operate on “temperance principles”. The first greenkeeper was also appointed on a weekly wage of 28 shillings.

The opening ceremony took place on 5th June 1909 exactly 5 months after the inception of the club – only one bowling green was ready for this event. The Glasgow Herald on 7th June reported the opening:

. A formal opening took place of Woodend Bowling and Tennis club, Jordanhill when a large turnout of ladies and gentlemen” presented “a silver key to open the palatial pavilion. In a bright, racy speech, Mr Fortune (FSS) congratulates the committee on their successful work which enabled them to open with a membership of 400 ……………”.

 
Woodend Old Clubhouse.jpg

Early Days

The first ladies and gentlemen’s tennis championships were held in July 1909 with a musical fete and garden party held on 17th September to raise further funds.

 

The West of Scotland Laws Tennis Association’s used the tennis courts for their 1912 tournament – something which became a regular occurrence. The Gents Firsts won the First Division League in that year.

During the First World War, 79 members joined the armed forces with 9 being killed in action. On several occasions during the war, Woodend entertained hundreds of wounded servicemen and women from hospitals around the city.

 

In 1924, the original pavilion became unsound and it was agreed to erect a new clubhouse at the cost of £3500. The building of this was finally agreed in 1927 and it opened on 12th November 1928.

Towards the 1959 Jubilee

All members of the club on war service in the Second World War were elected honorary members of the club. During WW2, the clubhouse was used for primary classes in Jordanhill School as the school had been requisitioned by the Military Authorities. During this time a shortage of tennis balls was noted by the committee.

The fundraising efforts of the ladies during this period raised £234 for the War Relief Fund.

In 1947 a proposal to allow Sunday tennis between 2pm and 6pm was defeated due to opposition from neighbouring properties.

The club had an ongoing issue with retaining green keepers due to a housing shortage and in 1955 secured a property ay 610 Crow Road for £1262 for this purpose.

 
 

This page is evolving and we will add to it as we uncover more interesting Woodend facts and pictures  from the past. If you have any information about days gone by or images you would like to share please message us through the club Facebook page here.

 

30 Chamberlain Road, Glasgow, G13 1QE

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